A lot of problems have arisen over in Drupal Land where people have been forced to use things like Composer in order to just test modules out... Take the Commerce Guys "Address" module as a perfect example: To try it out, one must first download and install Git, then download and configure Composer, then issue commands to download Address whereby you're then expected to log into the D8 site to enable the module... That's an awful tech debt just to test something out and because of this, it's acting as incentive for many people to jump from the Drupal ship once and for all.

Does Backdrop have similar workflows and if not, are you guys intended to force users into things like that? I get the value of version control systems and dependency managers but they shouldn't act as prerequisites for using something like Drupal (or Backdrop) as they represent tools some view as necessary while others may not.

I'd love to read your guys' thoughts on this (which I'm sure you've covered already but being new to Backdrop, I've been out of your guys' loop).

Thanks in advance and keep up the great work.

Most helpful answers

So far there are no plans to use a composer-based workflow for Backdrop. There are some advanced users who may choose to go that route, but it is absolutely not required for the majority of people who use Backdrop CMS to also use composer, or even Git.

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jenlampton's picture

So far there are no plans to use a composer-based workflow for Backdrop. There are some advanced users who may choose to go that route, but it is absolutely not required for the majority of people who use Backdrop CMS to also use composer, or even Git.

Thanks for responding, Jen.

For anyone reading this, I'm not at all against such things as Git and or Composer, etc. I know they have their place but I believe they should always be optional aspects. So it's the "forced ideal" that I'm massively against: Forcing things like Composer, etc. onto everyone under the pitch that "it's the future" or the guise of representing "innovation" isn't something I view as accommodating.

While in some situations those things might be useful or even necessary, ultimately they boil down to one's preferences when in the context of something that is ultimately separate from them (i.e. - the CMS in question).

I was excited about D8 but all that went out the window when it would not install on a shared hosting account with out shell access and some convoluted way of installing things. That was it for me for Drupal and have built lot of sites using Drupal since D5.

I have no trouble using composer. The problem is that composer has caused more trouble than it has solved. There are now a whole lot of sites that can't be updated from 8.3 to 8.4 because of a dependency problem with Drush 8. So, now everyone has got to go to Drush 9, which breaks all sorts of things. Someone called Drupal 8 the Windows Vista of Drupal. Like the Space Shuttle, it's a complex beast that blows up too often.